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for that. tavis: the fact that we are disinterested in science, as expressed by the under- performing grades of our students in science classes, what is behind that? is it possible to arrest that development? >> there is a concern up and down the chain in the country, and part of it is, yes, we have to get people interested in science from a young age. i get questions from seven-year- olds, which is really exciting. it turns out that people are signing up to be engineering and science majors, but by the time they have graduated, they have dropped. why? what is going on? is it too hard? there is a lot of studying going on there. tavis: this belief, my word, not yours, but this does belief that many americans have one science tells us -- but this disbelief that many americans have on science -- what is behind this abiding disbelief? >> i happen to believe is a matter of not watching enough science television. tavis: [laughs] >> it is where you live. it is who is doing the teaching. is it really that important? yes. science is research. science is innovation. it is our ticket to every bu
government's role in infrastructure, in science and technology, would take us so far away from what we need, i wish president obama had the revenues to do more, but it is the republican side that is blocking that because that party has one idea only. and that is to cut taxes for the rich. we have this multi-brazilian there running for office. his money is in the cayman island. he pays 13% in taxes. he says the most important thing is to cut the tax rates at the top for the. it is mind-boggling that we have this kind of blatant candidacy. people are hurting, people are upset. that is why this weirdness even has a choice. but it would take as exactly in the wrong direction. president obama could have done more and would have done more if the republican opposition had not blocked the end of the bush era tax cuts for the rich, for example. so romney is in quite a position to be blaming president obama for that when it is exactly this side that has made the kind of recovery we need so fleeting and evanescent. we need a strong recovery, but the policies he is recommending would be the opposite of
.org. >> when the new california academy of sciences opened in 2008, it quickly became one of the top tourist magnets in the city. part of the cal academies' astronomical success is the weekly nightlife party. >> i am joined by helen, who is here to school me on all the nocturnal activities that are getting ready to take place here. tell us a little about what we can expect to see at nightlife. >> we open up the doors every thursday night at the california academy of sciences. there are certain things you can see every week you can go to the museum, visit the planetarium, and we bring in bars and a deejay or band. it is a different feel from during the day, something different every week. tonight , we have beer and music. -- tonight we have great beer and music. it is beer week. we have a dozen local brewers in african hall. we have a deejays to set up throughout the museum and a live performance at 9:00 p.m. tonight. >> what has been your favorite part as a participant or as an observer? >> my favorite part is to walk around the aquarium in to see people with a drink in their hands, getting
it to have our public policy be guided less about compromise and more about science. [applause] and buy accurate public policy analysis, studies that show things like what are the awards reaped from investment in public funding of contraception? what do we gain from that? what are the consequences if we do not? it has been disappointing to see the ways in which science has been pushed out of so much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming in for services, frequently abortion services, that are based on untrue science. that is a scary moment. regardless of how you feel about abortion and your personal or legal beliefs, to require medical professionals to mislead their patience is not where we should be as a country. those type of scientific facts and accurate analyses should be given much more credence in our political and government process than our ideology. [applause] >> i think it is fair to ask this question. i received some e-mails from constituents and others who sa
science on earth. and this is an odd kind of expedition for another reason. usually scientists go off in different directions, different times using their own tools. for mer the entire team was all together. 150 scientists and engineers balancing together, as it were, like on a huge skateboard creeping over the sand, up the down and hills and craters meters at a time for eight years. so it's something like being on a ship, on an early voyageover discovery. the scientists and the sailing crew were all having to travel together. they had to negotiate how long are we going to stay here in where are we going to go next in and what should we do at each site? and this requires a well coordinated understanding of their roles, schedules, resources, long-term plans and a clear chain of command. if you visited the science and engineering coordination meeting during the prime mission, which was the first 90 days of landing on mars in 2004, same thing we're going through now with curiosity during these 90 days, you could see the scientists up front on the bridge, as it were, with huge displays of
with the gets? >> doing s.t.e.avenue. m. >> science, technology, engineering, art and math. >> hey, do you do "gangnam style." >> what does that mean? >> gangnam sfooil? >> psy. the horse dance. >> the horse dance. >> you got it. >> like that. >> there we go. >> oh, yeah. oh, yeah. ♪ >> almost as good as david gregory. >> you name, it elmo can do it. >> there we go. >> that was fantastic. >> let's talk about -- did you read the "new york times." >> yeah, "new york times." there's an article that the word really is overused. >> really? >> really. >> really. >> a whole article devoted to, that really? >> really. >> it used to be kind of like that's surprising, but now it's that snarky really? >> really. >> really. >> it has been overused. by the writers and shows to make that kind of funny turn. it has been a little overused. what are some other -- i'm actually thinking of like, you know, like. >> like, and, you know, i'm a complete offender. >> seriously. >> serious ly. >> really? >> what words are overused? >> elmo loves overusing love. >> oh. >> you can't overuse that word. >> you can't ov
in education. you see more young men majoring in math and science and more young women majoring in actually gender studies, literature, fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. then when they enter the workplace you see more women going into nonprofits. you see more women working shorter hours and you see more men and investment banks and computer science. there isn't any reason that these two groups should be paid the same if they make different choices. a man an and a woman in an investment bank, face both start at goldman sachs, those should be paid to sing. they are paid the same. if they are not there are avenues to pursue, but that's a big difference. >> what you think about the white house council on women and girls? >> well, i think the white house needs have a council on men and boys. you can see that young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, then the single men have lower earnings. you can see that there are far higher rates of voice dropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less e
. bush administration. he's now a professor of political science and public policy at duke university. we thank you both for being with us. peter feaver, to you first. we heard governor romney today criticize the president broadly for not rejecting strongly enough america's influence in the world. yet when it came to specifics, we didn't hear many details. so let me just ask you about a couple of different places in the world. what about when it comes to iran. what exactly governor romney be doing differently right now? >> well, this is the criticism that the obama campaign has leveled at the romney campaign for not being detailed and specific enough. when it comes to iran, the president hasn't laid out a red line that he said clearly he would enforce. when asked to be precise about what it means for iran not to possess a nuclear weapon, the articulation of the red line, he's been vague and says he doesn't want to parse it further. i think there's a certain element of ambiguity about where you would draw the line precisely so as to avoid being trapped by it. but the other point to make is
-selling science writer will talk about the cyberworld, popular culture and computer networking as a political tool. mr. johnson is the author of eight nonfiction books including every name, were good ideas come from an the 2012 release, future perfect. >> host: steven johnson come in your newest book, in a network age, use those term pre-progressive. what is that? >> guest: it is my attempt to come up with a term for this new political philosophy that i see emerging all around me. the book is really people who are trying to change the world in trying to ban progress, but he don't completely fit the existing models that we have between the left in the right or democrats and republicans. they believe in many ways that the way the internet was built, the way the web was built, the way things that wikipedia were built, using these collaborative. the works, where people come together from different points of view and openly collaborating, building ideas, that that mechanism is a tremendous engine for progress and growth. but it doesn't necessarily involve a government and doesn't necessarily involve ca
, the ones who had really, you know, profound new ideas on science, had this interesting pattern where they, actually had a lot more kind of failed papers. and they published, they had far more volume to their work, and a huge number of those papers never went anywhere. it was every now and then, there would be one that would be incredible breakout hit and would change science forever, then most of the time they were starting out hitting like baseball a short little ground out whereas the none in -- noninnovative thinkers, who hadn't had disruptive idea, they were just hitting kind of singles and were much more consistent, had higher batting average but weren't swinging for the fences. so the argument is that to really be kind of successful in a new way and open up a new door or possibility in your field or science or some other field you have to have tolerance for failure and error. that is one of the things we see in silicon valley. is that that is if you're an entrepreneur in silicon valley and you haven't had at least one failed startup people look at you strangely. you're supposed to t
speculation, as science and technology converge, ground-breaking developments in medicine continue to emerge. cramer's zeroing in on one biotech speck that could be on the verge of a major move. all coming up on "mad money." >>> don't miss a second of "mad money." got @jimcramer on twitter. have a question? tweet cramer at #madtweets. send an e-mail to madmoney@cnbc.com or give us a call at 1-800-743-cnbc. miss something? head to madmoney.cnbc.com. when you take a closer look... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. on gasoline. i am probably going to the gas station about once a month. last time i was at a gas station was about...i would say... two months ago. i very rarely put gas in my chevy volt. i go to the gas station such a small amount that i forget how to put gas in my car. [
is in decline. researchers at the australian institute of marine science say the reef has lost half of its coral cover over the past 27 years. there are multiple causes, including a destructive kind of starfish shown here. we look at what's behind it and what's at stake-- in australia and around the world-- with nancy knowlton, a coral reef biologist and a chair of marine science at the smithsonian national museum of natural history here in washington. welcome. >> thanks. how has all of this coral died off? do we know what's causing it? is it all that... >> it's not all the star fish. the star fish is about 42%. typhoons, big strong storms another 48% and then coral bleaching is the remaining 10% which is caused whenever the water gets too hot. >> ifill: so this is human causedded? >> yes. most of it is human caused. i mean a coral reef naturally goes through cycles of up and down. but it shouldn't be declining by half over course of 27 years. >> ifill: i feel like we have talked before about the declining coral cover. but not... but i'm wondering whether it's now picking up speed or whether thi
the senate until the kink of junk science opened his month. with the senate in the balance, let's talk about favorite senate races and surely what's going on in missouri never ceases to amuse me. the crazy uncle has been let out of the back room and into the party. he keeps talking and he keeps staying alive. he's only 3 points behind. missourians are saying we don't like either people. who do we like least, best, bad, worse. it's problematic both ways, but the gop has refunded to todd akin to supporting him, newt gingrich has endorsed him, rick santor santorum, i believe you like him, too. >> i do. >> they both endorse him. it seems that the gop once running from todd akin has said winning the senate at all costs is valuable. >> some in the gop, some. >> it's interesting, you know. missouri there's a mirror image situation in massachusetts. missouri is a red state that doesn't really like the republican candidate personally. you look at massachusetts, and another key senate race. this is a blue state that really likes the republican person, scott brown, whose re-election is critical to taki
parties."but mileah kromer...who is a political science professor at goucher pollege....says independent vottrs...are still sending a message.(kromer) "what they hhpeeii for a third party candidate, is to rrn and get their ideas out there, ttat hoppfully their ideas will be aaopted by one of the major party candidates."" (mitchell) "i vote for democrats at times, i vote for republicans at times."and according to ""-4"...that hould be the principle...of any p5 news at ttn. n ryyell,,foxx - more ttan 377thouuaad marylanders are registered with the green, libertariin or coming up in our 6 o'cloock hour... a smmll stowaway... gives a beltsville man trouble on the road. road.the strange sight he found... ffer popping the hood. oriolee closer jim johnson comes through for the ttam.thee game winning performance he gave... in the 9tt. ((break 3)) 3 3 the orioles fann patieece second time in two days, the start of the home playoff ggme orioles get their firstthome but it wwsn't easy. wei-yii chen was great, but in the first inning he watched with all of us, one of the weirrdst plays ou'll ever
scouting out locations or a fake science fiction movie titled "argo." this is about 30 minutes. >> if we could have everybody in the back come on up that's going to join us. thank you so much for your patience. the reports we were getting was that the traffic around the block was around as. apparently -- thank you. people are nodding, so that's good. thank you very much. there may be some people still held up and we will welcome them. welcome to the international spy museum. i'm peter earnest, executive director and i'll ask you as a courtesy, to those for recording the program and to the speakers, the kind enough to turn off your cell phones, pdas and so forth. that would be a big help. thank you. well, it's wonderful to see all of you here for the signing, and as we kick off the signing, i will show you a clip of the film based on the book for which you came to attempt the signing. so with that said we will go right ahead and come up and do the interview with tony. >> [inaudible] >> has shocked the civilized world. more than 60 american citizens continue to be held as hostages. >> six
a carcinogen in their bodies. >> i would go back to medical fact and science. according to evidence based medicine. >> this is the world health organization. >> birth control is safe, and it is 90 percent effective. in relation to talking to the 13 and 15 year-old, we believe that is the role of a parent. what we do every single day is encourage parents to have conversations with their children. the vast majority of teenagers in texas want to hear from their parents about their bodies. planned parenthood de amelie teach your but the science. we hope you teach them about the immorality, your gun, and your views on science. again, we believe that all people have the right to scientifically based medically accurate information. [applause] >> hi. i'm laura. catholic wife of one, mother of two. i am here to give probably a different perspective about contraception and i hope to be a voice of a different option for all these beautiful men and women in the audience. i have been married for 20 years . i embrace the gift of the catholic teaching about contraception. the last 16, and fanatical and
and secondary level with science education. liz: how do we get people to be interested in science and engineering? >> it takes good curriculum, good teachers and good schools. as we all know, teachers can make all the difference in turning on student curiosity. it really takes a whole number of things to really come together. liz: how to look at what is happening today? unemployment dropped to 7.8%. on the surface, it looks good, some people question it. what do you see out there in the trenches as a business leader? >> well, in all honesty, there are a lot of people who are unemployed, there are actually quite a few who are underemployed. there is no question the economy is not creating as many good, solid high-paying jobs. liz: they always ask business people what the problem is and they say uncertainty. >> i do not think it is as much uncertainty. you have to have an increase in demand of your products that justify the need for more manufacturing, more employees and there is a point in fact for us in 2012 our volume is less than it was last year. there is not a lot of justifica
of the new england institute for cognitive science, and he is cofounder of the new england institute for cognitive science, an evolutionary study. religious studies at the university of very good. he's been an unflagging student of how human beings make their way in the world, even though that way is often not pretty. he challenges each reader to tinker with their own wiring, to be aware, and he hopes to do better. for his profound insights into the human condition and into the conditions, some humans play some others, we present him the anisfield-wolf book award for nonfiction. [applause] ♪ the night this is wonderful and i deeply appreciate the fact that such a distinguished jury read my book, much less thought it worthy of this great honor. in a moment i am going to read you an excerpt from "less than human," which deals the course of the atrocities of the past. but i think it is useful to remind ourselves that the plaintiff considering atrocities that the path is to make a better future. if we can understand what has driven us to do the terrible thing we've done to our fellow h
will take a close look here at edwards life sciences. this is a company that deals a lot with your heart. heart valve therapy, critical care, cardiac surgery, they are cutting their sales outlook for the third quarter. a couple reasons why they are doing this. take a look at the two-day chart. down nearly 20% today. that is a huge move for a company that has had a nice run for the year 2012. they are blaming europe. also, the expected growth here in the u.s. was not what they anticipated. lori: thank you. move over baggage fees, long lines and delays. talking on your cell phone at 10,000 feet. what do you think? next season take a look at some of today's winners and losers. green mountain coffee. up almost 2% on the day. we will be right back. ♪ 0t[h7 [ male announcer ] what if you had thermal night-vision goggles, like in a special opsission? you'd spot movement, gather intelligence with minimal coateral damage. but rather than neutralizing enemies in their sleep, you'd be targeti stocks to trade. well, that's what trade architect's heat maps do. they make you a trading assassin. tra
some of the spider's we see here on display. >> at the california academy of sciences, there is a very large collection of preserved and live specimens, which are the evidence about evolution. we have the assassin spiders, which are spiders that exclusively kill and eat other spiders. they are under the microscope here. research done and the california academy's i rhinology lab suggests that the assassin spiders have been doing this for over 150 million years. this glassed in room is a real scientific laboratory, and the people in that room are preparing specimens of vertebrate, that is mammals and birds. the way they do this is to remove the skin, sew it together in a relatively lifelike pose, and ensure that it does not decompose. >> i am a really big class actress fan, so i am here to see them, and beer week. >> i wanted to learn something and have fun. >> i always enjoy it. i am not all is well -- always working as i am tonight. sometimes i come to enjoy the music and to dance. ♪ >> culturewire covers the arts in san francisco, and one of my favorite culture artists is here tonig
. a report from our chief science correspondent robert bazell. >> reporter: about a million people receive steroid shots in the spine for back pain every year. several hundred patients are now receiving phone calls like this one -- >> this is cindy checking on our patients that had epidural steroid injections. need to know if everything's okay. >> reporter: health officials are now investigating 26 cases of severe meningitis in five states including four deaths. officials are trying to track down hundreds of other people in 23 states who got the injections and might be at risk. nbc news has learned health officials believe the outbreak originated at the new england compounding center near boston. the company is recalling hundreds of doses of a steroid compound it made for those lumbar injections believed to be contaminated with a fungus. >> one of the striking early features of this outbreak -- remember, we're still gathering data -- is that many of these patients are certainly middle-aged, they have back problems, but they're otherwise pretty healthy. >> reporter: a company like the new e
for concern for moms and their newborns, especially boys. a report from our chief science correspondent, robert bazell. >> reporter: jenna, like many moms, worries about producting her young kids from chemical contamination. especially the effects of the the chemical, bpa, found in plastics. >> i'm avoiding plastic in general. we try to drink out of glass. all of our water bottles, we take away with us, are reuseable. they're glass or metal. >> reporter: a new study suggests that moms may be passing along effects of bpa to their kids. in a study of 500 pregnant women, those with the highest levels of bpa have lower thyroid levels. and so did their infant sons. why only boys? scientists aren't sure. but they see the same thing in animal studies. thyroid hormones help control many systems in the body and can affect childhood development. >> if bpa is affecting the levels during pregnancy, this could be affecting the learning, memory and behavior of children later in life. >> reporter: bpa is part of many widely used plastic products. including can liners in certain bottles. most americans
to be less about public policy being guided by compromise and more about having it be guided by science and by -- [applause] by accurate public policy analysis, by studies show things like what are the rewards that are reaped from investment in public funding of contraception or in having a view of the insured as a society and what as a society we gain from that. what of the consequences if we don't? if it has been very disappointing to see the ways in which over the last few years science is really being pushed out of some much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming for services, frequently abortion services that are based on the ranchers science. and that is a scary moment, regardless of how you feel about abortion and what your personal legal police are up at to what to require medical professionals to the mislead their patience is not where we should be as a country, and that in those type of scientific facts and accurate public policy analyses should be given much m
of marine science says the number of reefs has dropped from 100 to 47. since 1985. the scientists identified two main causes of coral decline. the crown of thorn star fish is growing rapidly in number. the fish feed on the coral. and ocean warming is bleaching the coral. the scientists say this prevents the reef from recovering after cyclone damage. they worn coral cover could halve again by the end of the next decade if current trends continue. >> we believe that if we can take action on one of the things we can directly control, the crown of thorn starfish, it may leave the reef in a position where it can better withstand some of these climatic impacts. >> the reef extends more than 2,000 kilometers off the coast of northeastern australia. >>> officials and locals in india pulled together to pull one endangered species from the mud. they spent ten hours digging an indian rhinoceros from a swamp in the northeastern state. about 2,300 rhinos live in the national park, two-thirds of the world's population of the endangered animal. one of the rhinos strayed from the park after it was hit by fl
today and i checked at the inner harbor near the maryland science center. a rain delay for some light rain showers. just over 25 inches for the year and we're running a deficit of over 7 inches. the high today, 15 degrees below the average of 69. the record low below freezing in 2001. it is chilly and 53 at the inner harbor. at the eastern shore, temperatures are cool. we're running into the low 50's. there you see the cold producing this out today in the mountains. 34 in oakland. there are freeze warnings in effect for the western sliver of allegheny county and into the mountains of west virginia. we will stay here, mainly cloudy and a chance of a brief sprinkle. this weather disturbances in the upper levels of the atmosphere. it is moving east and it will take the showers offshore. we may get a break for two in the clouds before the next front roles in wednesday afternoon. there will be important for the orioles heading of i-95 to new york. a few breaks in the cloud cover. temperatures will recover. here comes the next front and there are some showers in the catskills west of new yo
a statement for us. so we'd love to here it. >> yes. >> i'm a retired librarian with a ba in political science from new york oust and a masters from peabody. i was born in new york city in 1919, moved to maryland 51 years ago. i have two daughters and two grandchildren. i've been active in piece and other forward looking organizations all my life. the drone part has four posts, nonviolence, environmental and west dom, social justice, grass roots democracy. violence is an inherently self-defeating policy. the u.s. seems to be waging war without end. we have troops in 150 countries. i say prink all the troops -- bring all the troops home within a year. not ri lens action aligns peaceful means with peaceful ends. my own friend dean sharp on the faculty of harvard wrote this and many other books on nonviolence. even some military officials agree with dpoan that nonviolence is practical and replace some military projects. the cost of military hardware is terrific. the cost ofen in violent message is negligible. mccarty wrote i'd rather teach peace and several other books. he has initiated successfu
professor are the winners of the nobel prize in science. the prize is $1.2 million that they will share. a quick reminder of our top story, hugo chavez has hailed his presidential electoion win as a continuance of his socialist revolution. stay with us. there's plenty more to come. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles.
the "west wing"." >> it's not rocket science, it's labeled, but it takes a voter extra ten seconds to find it. >> cenk: how he would have done last night. all that and the elbow of the day. well somebody elbowed themselves. you might have been able to guess it. that's all on "the young turks." guess what time is it? you know it. you guessed that too. it's go time. >> romney: i will not under any circumstances raise taxons middle income families. >> obama: he said his big bold idea is never mind. >> the defendant was not able to defend himself. >> i'm sorry i'll stop the subsidy to pbs. i love big bird. >> he has been rehearsing for this since last june. >> i have no idea what you're talking about. i may need to get a new accountant. >> some fundamental dishonesty that we saw last night. >> we need more firement, more teachers, it's time to cut back on government. >> the reject the idea that i don't like teachers. >> romney had a momentum. >> i have to respond. >> i said i'm not a perfect man and i wouldn't be a perfect president, and that's probably a promise that governor romney thinks i
of sandstorm gold is next. >>> later, smart speculation, as science and technology converge, ground-breaking developments in medicine continue to emerge. cramer's zeroing in on one biotech spec that could be on the verge of a major move. all coming up on "mad money." >>> don't miss a second of "mad money." got @jimcramer on twitter. have a question? tweet cramer at #madtweets. send an e-mail to madmoney@cnbc.com or give us a call at 1-800-743-cnbc. miss something? head to madmoney.cnbc.com. [singing] hoveround takes me where i wanna go... where will it send me... one call to hoveround and you'll be singing too! pick up the phone and call hoveround, the premier power chair. hoveround makes it easier than any other power chair. hoveround is more maneuverable to get you through the tightest doors and hallways. more reliable. hoveround employees build your chair, deliver your chair, and will service your chair for as long as you own your chair. most importantly, 9 out of 10 people got their hoveround for little or no cost. call now for your free dvd and information kit. you don't really
location for a fake science fiction movie titled "argo." it's about thirty minutes. if we can have nerve the back come on. thank you for your patience. we have -- the reports we were getting was that the traffic around the block here was horrendous. apparently thank you, people are nodding. that's good. thank you very much. so there may be some people held up still. we'll welcome them. welcome to the international spy museum. i'm peter, the executive directer. ly ask you as a court sei those who are recording the program and the speakers to be kind enough to turn off your cell phone, pda and so forth. that would be a big help. thank you. that said we'll go ahead and come up and do the interview with tony. the people die. we want the six of them out. what we want is -- deliver the six by providing them with -- you can send them training wheels and get them to the board we are gatorade. it would take a miracle to get them out. what are we watching? i have an idea. there are canadian film crew for science fiction. we file together as a company. this is how we make a big movie. you want to c
, it is not rocket science, voters want mitt romney to convince them that that he has a plan to make america recover faster than president obama and that his policies will improve the lives of all americans over the next four years. he is effective when he draws contrasts between the president's failed policies and when he would do differently and reinforcing it saying, i am a principled, but practical candidate, i am willing to work across party lines to fix america's most pressing problems. >> eric: julie, what does the president need to do to bounce back? >> what he has been doing all along, you saw him leading in the polls because the president's campaign has been incredibly effective in the swig -- swing state, convincing voters that mitt romney shouldn't be trusted and nothing in romney's record as governor of massachusetts or bain capital would reflect well in the presidency. look, i will be the first to say, he bombed that debate. it was abysmal. it was a really horrible performance. there are a few more left. i am sure he won't be caught flat footed this time. and the numbers haven't shifte
, palestinian history and political science professors aleh -- saleh hamayel. >> whenever a colonial settler situation never used the natives as their force, their fate was always genocide. total, physical extermination. now that was not easy to do in the middle of the 20th-century. fortunately for us, the done is to project came in 1948. it was too late to duplicate what happened for the indians of north america. >> your response, dennis banks, to the palestinian political science professor? >> i think -- his presence is very strong. i listened intently to what he was saying. after we had a chance to look at the comparisons of this happening in palestine now as to what happened with us during the 1930's and 1940's. it is the same pattern. i said that on the very first day when this -- what is happening to those people is what we went through during the last century. it is, unfortunately, it is the same people. it is the u.s. government with funneled money to israel and then it goes to hurt the palestinian people. >> dennis banks, thank you for being with us today as we conclude this day of
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 281 (some duplicates have been removed)